International Student Blog

Blogician, heal thyself

In my short time as the international blogger for UiB, I’ve offered a lot of advice. Now, it’s awfully easy to dole out advice, and it’s harder to take advice and take action. So, I thought I’d check myself: how well have I followed my own advice for international students recently? Here are four actions I think support the argument that I am following my own advice and assimilating into student life in Norway:

 

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Photo by Stand Hiestand

In my short time as the international blogger for UiB, I’ve offered a lot of advice. Now, it’s awfully easy to dole out advice, and it’s harder to take advice and take action. So, I thought I’d check myself: how well have I followed my own advice for international students recently? Here are four actions I think support the argument that I am following my own advice and assimilating into student life in Norway:

 

 

Attend Local Events:

In last week’s post, Oh the people you’ll meet, I mentioned an event at Hulen, former air raid shelter turned student-driven rock club. While I couldn’t make it to last Saturday’s swapfest, I did get out to Hulen (link in Norwegian) on Friday to see Silja Sol, a local musician.

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Photo by Stand Hiestand

 

As I mingled with students and fans of Silja and her band, I though to myself that 62nok is a pretty good price for a stout. I must be acclimating to Norway.

 

 

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Photo by Stand Hiestand

 

 

 

Speaking of acclimating… it is still winter, and there is still… weather, but now at least it’s snow!

 

 

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Get Outside:

Earlier this month, I shared the Norwegian adage, “There is no bad weather, only bad clothing“, I even named the blog post after it. In it I recommended getting outdoors. I followed that advice this weekend (although it’s arguable that I really was going with the Norwegian custom to drop everything and head outside when the sun comes out). I went out for a “Sunday walk”. It is ‘typically Norwegian’ to go for a hike each Sunday, although I’ve only ever heard it referred to as the “Sunday walk” (Norwegians are hardcore). Ok, in truth I missed it by a day: I headed up Fløyen on Saturday (recommend in the post above), where everyone was out skiing, sledding, and adventuring on the mountain. Although, maybe the natives waited till Sunday, I did hear a lot of french.

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Photo by Stand Hiestand

Make Friends with Norwegians

In my post, Meet a Norwegian – blogger! I asked our Norwegian blogger, Carl if there were good ways to meet Norwegians. He suggested joining a student organization, or emailing him for a chat over a cup a coffee. In the interest of making new friends and maybe even some Norwegian connections, when a friend was kind enough to introduce me to a party this Friday, I went. I am so glad I did. I even got to meet some Norway-natives! They were so sweet, and I had a blast getting to spend an evening with them. They even showed me some “Norwegian culture” on youtube.

 

 

As an American, I feel like they’re trying to tell me something. I can’t really argue. Norwegian does have Æ, Ø, and Å.

 

I was also treated to this very Norwegian feeling song about a cabin.

Explore Cultural Opportunities

On Monday, I attended a folk music concert at the Columbi Egg in Hotel Augustin for only 50 nok, recommended by one of the tour guides on The International Exchange Erasmus Student Network’s student tour of Bergen – as I mentioned in the Touring Bergen post.

 

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This Monday, Monoswezi played (video below). They are a group of musicians originally from Mozambique, Norway, Sweden and Zimbabwe. Monoswezi combines their respect for tradition with jazz and modern Western music influences.

 

We were even treated to a sing-along of what I can only assume was a more traditional Norwegian song.

 

 


 

At the very least, I feel like I’m taking my own advice. Maybe someone else has advice they want to share? Anybody else assimilating into the Bergen student lifestyle? Comment below and let us know what you’re up to.

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